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  • People identify as 'global citizens'
  • People identify as 'global citizens'
    Marco Derksen (2012) ©
SIGNAL

People identify as 'global citizens'

More and more people are identifying as global citizens rather than citizens of the country they live in. Though the idea of global citizenship is something for people to interpret themselves, it's been suggested that recent increases in migration could be driving these changes in attitude.

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