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  • Emojis can be easy to misinterpret
  • Emojis can be easy to misinterpret
    Kim (2012) ©
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Emojis can be easy to misinterpret

Over two billion smartphone users send six billion emojis a day. And most Gen Yers now believe that these symbols improve our ability to communicate. But research shows that emojis may be more confusing than we think, as they can have different meanings to different people.

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