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  • Facebook is using AI to describe photos to the blind
  • Facebook is using AI to describe photos to the blind
    Janssem Cardoso (2016) ©
SIGNAL

Facebook is using AI to describe photos to the blind

Given the role images play on Facebook, it can undoubtedly be frustrating for those who struggle to see them. To combat this, Facebook is using AI to describe pictures to blind or visually impaired users, ensuring they can feel as connected to the world as everyone else.

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