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  • Yeo Valley launches limited edition leftovers
  • Yeo Valley launches limited edition leftovers
    Yeo Valley (2015) ©
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Yeo Valley launches limited edition leftovers

Imagine if we all actually used our leftovers. Yogurt brand Yeo Valley is doing just that, putting leftovers back into products. The Strawberry and Fig ‘Left-Yeovers’ is changing how we view what’s left in our fridges and saving the planet in the process. But do people really want to eat leftovers?

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