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  • Hard-to-read fonts can increase sales of a product
  • Hard-to-read fonts can increase sales of a product
    US Department of Agriculture (2010) ©
SIGNAL

Hard-to-read fonts can increase sales of a product

Overly fancy fonts can be frustrating, but new research suggests that making messages harder to read may actually make them easier to maintain. Despite people saying they prefer simpler typefaces, those that are difficult to take in may make people more likely to purchase products.

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