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  • Condé Nast is blocking ad blocking
  • Condé Nast is blocking ad blocking
    Elvert Barnes (2006) ©
SIGNAL

Condé Nast is blocking ad blocking

More people are using ad blocking software when browsing the internet, causing a real issue for sites that generate revenue from advertising. In response, Condé Nast’s men's mag GQ has begun asking readers to either turn their adblock off or pay to access its articles.

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