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  • Ethical products tied to personal well-being
  • Ethical products tied to personal well-being
    David Mery (2013) ©
SIGNAL

Ethical products tied to personal well-being

Eco-friendly products have created a lot of buzz in recent years, but are environmental benefits a bonus or a necessity for consumers? Survey results suggest that for brands in the food and drink industry, a sustainable approach is now a must-have in order to please ethical shoppers.

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