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  • Health apps failing to keep people engaged
  • Health apps failing to keep people engaged
    Glenn Euloth (2012) ©
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Health apps failing to keep people engaged

We download health apps with the best intentions. But with more than half of US smartphone users having at least one on their phone, and over 40% having five or more, how often do people actually use them? Not very, according to research published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

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