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  • Amazon is opening a brick-and-mortar bookstore
  • Amazon is opening a brick-and-mortar bookstore
    Marjan Lazarevski (2013) ©
SIGNAL

Amazon is opening a brick-and-mortar bookstore

Amazon has often been accused of being responsible for the closure of high street businesses. Yet now it’s opened a brick-and-mortar bookstore to showcase its products, using a data-led approach to determine inventory. Do consumers really want to buy from the e-commerce giant in the flesh?

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