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  • Indian women are turning to online doctors
  • Indian women are turning to online doctors
    Trinity Care Foundation (2014) ©
SIGNAL

Indian women are turning to online doctors

When your family doctor advises that you get pregnant in order to solve your endometriosis, the desire for a second opinion is understandable. As women in India struggle to achieve gender equality across the board, they’re turning to the internet to find more accurate, impartial medical advice.

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