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  • China's e-commerce goes brick-and-mortar
  • China's e-commerce goes brick-and-mortar
    EG Focus (2011) ©
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China's e-commerce goes brick-and-mortar

Buying clothes in-store can be a hassle, impeded by long queues and limited stock. But seeing potential purchases in person provides a far richer experience than e-commerce. So why not have the best of both worlds – trying on items in-store but skipping the queues and ordering online?

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