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  • The return of the humble pen
  • The return of the humble pen
    Phree (2015) ©
SIGNAL

The return of the humble pen

Remember those early touchscreen phones that came with a stylus? Better yet, do you remember the classic pen (of pen-and-paper fame), which enabled us to write whatever we wanted outside of the available fonts? Don’t get too nostalgic; the humble pen could be set to make a comeback.

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