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  • For teens, online friends are real friends
  • For teens, online friends are real friends
    Ryan Tir (2011) ©
SIGNAL

For teens, online friends are real friends

If you make a friend online, are they ‘real’? Would you count them as someone to depend on? For an increasing number of teenagers, the answer is yes. A study by Pew has found that young people are forging and maintaining numerous meaningful relationships entirely online.

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