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  • Why people secretly break their own stuff
  • Why people secretly break their own stuff
    Björn Lindell (2013) ©
SIGNAL

Why people secretly break their own stuff

Fancy upgrading to the latest smartphone or television? Most consumers would, and do, even though their current stuff works perfectly fine. Research sheds light on how some consumers justify these seemingly unnecessary purchases; by mistreating the items they already have.

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