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  • Why fidgeting is good for us
  • Why fidgeting is good for us
    Ed Yourdan (2015) ©
SIGNAL

Why fidgeting is good for us

Stress is the second most common reason for work absence in the UK, while 120,000 Americans die each year from conditions stemming from stress. But new research shows that letting off steam could be as easy as having a fidget; whether you're more inclined to doodle or chew your pen.

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