Hold On!

Hold Up

Please select a minimum of three sectors in the menu above.

Got It
  • D Free enables the elderly to keep their dignity
  • D Free enables the elderly to keep their dignity
    Osamu Kaneko (2011) ©
SIGNAL

D Free enables the elderly to keep their dignity

Across the world, populations are ageing rapidly. But in Japan – where more than a quarter of the population is over 65 – the opportunities to serve this demographic exclusively are sizeable. D Free is a new wearable device that’s giving Japanese seniors their dignity back.

Canvas8

Related

  • Article image How to reach Asia's bright old things

    Asia is notoriously home to some of the most active and beauty-conscious elderly people in the world; from Japanese retirees climbing Mount Everest to millions of Chinese seniors dancing in city squares. What can be learnt from fusing tradition and health to reach Asia's 'bright old things'?

  • Article image What it really means to grow old in Japan

    More than 25% of the Japanese population is over the age of 65. With a low birthrate and increasing life expectancy, that figure is only set to increase. Japan is renowned for its respectful and traditionally regimented attitudes towards seniors, but what does it really mean to be ageing now, in the world’s oldest population?

  • Article image PARO: tech that aids the elderly

    While the immediate future is unlikely to yield AI pseudo-human carers, the notion of robots aiding the elderly is closer than ever. All over the world – especially in Japan, where more than a quarter of the population is over 65 – technology and healthcare are starting to overlap.

  • Article image Life 2.0: empowering elderly communities

    Life 2.0 is an EU-funded project which has developed a series of networked applications to help empower elderly residents to live more independent lives.