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  • We can't resist food with a face
  • We can't resist food with a face
    Pilsbury (2014) ©
SIGNAL

We can't resist food with a face

From the Pillsbury Doughboy to Mr. Peanut, food mascots are part of our cultural landscape. But are they anything more than a cute curiosity? A new study suggests that they actually have a powerful psychological effect, eroding people’s ability to exercise impulse control.

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