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  • Nintendo’s future lies in the past
  • Nintendo’s future lies in the past
    Rob Fahey (2006) ©
SIGNAL

Nintendo’s future lies in the past

More than two thirds of Americans over the age of 18 are nostalgic for things from the past. Nintendo is tapping into that nostalgia by recycling an old favourite from 15 years ago – The Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask. Now with a reboot, this throwback has become a top seller.

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