Hold On!

Hold Up

Please select a minimum of three sectors in the menu above.

Got It
  • American Apparel plays it safe
  • American Apparel plays it safe
    American Apparel (2015) ©
SIGNAL

American Apparel plays it safe

Love them or hate them, American Apparel’s ads get noticed. From mannequins with pubic hair to print ads showing topless employees, there's always plenty of shock value. The new CEO is putting an end to ‘crotch shot campaigns’. But will this less offensive strategy also prove less effective?

Related

  • Article image Is there an art to pissing people off?

    According to the world of online dating, coming across as an arse to some can make others love you more. If having haters makes those who like you like you all the more, does the same psychology apply to our relationships with brands? And does it actually pay for a brand to rub part of its audience up the wrong way?

  • Article image Would you want a brand to be your BFF?

    Digitisation is helping brands and their customers communicate, forming narratives and relationships. Whether it's Netflix taking its viewers to prom, or Anchorman's Ron Burgundy reading the regional news, brands are manifesting in the real world, disguised as human beings.

  • Article image American Apparel: bringing back the bush

    To boost sales for Valentine's Day, American Apparel’s NYC SoHo branch adorned its mannequins with faux pubic hair. The message: au naturel is best. But is it anything more than a PR stunt?

  • Article image Spreadable media: why everyone's talking about Blurred Lines

    Sex sells – and so does controversy. But with a new focus on audience involvement, musicians and film-makers alike are handing their incendiary wares over for dissection and regurgitation.