Hold On!

Hold Up

Please select a minimum of three sectors in the menu above.

Got It
  • Parents pay for girls to feel like princesses
  • Parents pay for girls to feel like princesses
    Brittany Randolph (2009) ©
SIGNAL

Parents pay for girls to feel like princesses

From tulle canopies to quilted cribs, crown-shaped chandeliers to ruffled duvet covers, princess-themed bedrooms are all the rage among young girls. Home retailers are adapting to cater to parents prepared to put large sums of money behind this 'magic wand' approach to princess decor.

Related

  • Article image HelloFlo: making periods funny

    Tampon subscription service HelloFlo has won millions of fans by rejecting euphemism in favour of hilarious honesty. But what does its humorous take on being a 12-year-old girl tell us about what we really want from our most intimate brands? How honest is too honest?

  • Disney's 'Frozen' spurs Japanese feminism Disney's 'Frozen' spurs Japanese feminism

    Swapping the passive Disney Princess for two powerful female leads has helped Disney's Frozen become a global phenomenon. In Japan, where sexism prevails, the film's popularity has soared as it connects with a new generation of women.

  • Article image Mini Rodini: small clothes with big values

    Kidswear brand Mini Rodini combines bright, colourful prints with a staunchly ethical mindset – but as a mid-range label, why is it capturing the interest of Hollywood's biggest stars?

  • Article image LEGO for girls

    After years of ethnographic research and product development, classic toy company LEGO launched LEGO Friends, a product line aimed at girls aged five and over.