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  • Japanese farmers name their misshapen veg
  • Japanese farmers name their misshapen veg
    strikeael (2014) ©
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Japanese farmers name their misshapen veg

Misshapen vegetables don't generally tend to sell well – if at all – but Kyoto farmers have found a way around this by making up strange names for their wares. Often their namesakes are famous places in and around the city.

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