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  • DNA testing could affect charitable giving
  • DNA testing could affect charitable giving
    Pabak Sarkar (2014) ©
SIGNAL

DNA testing could affect charitable giving

Angelina Jolie famously had a double mastectomy after a DNA test led her to discover that she has a 87% genetic predisposition to breast cancer. As similar kits are becoming available at home, and people become more aware of illness, could the way they give to charity change?

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