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  • Branded content pays to be transparent
  • Branded content pays to be transparent
    AmazingPhil ©
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Branded content pays to be transparent

From Zoella to Bethany Mota, the most popular vloggers are attracting huge audiences, whether they're reviewing make-up and fashion or just making people laugh. And brands are looking to vloggers to advertise products, but is it a smart strategy if it's not transparent?

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