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  • How cycling became cool in the UK
  • How cycling became cool in the UK
    Team Sky ©
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How cycling became cool in the UK

Since Bradley Wiggins became the first British cyclist to win the Tour de France and star coach David Brailsford helped the GB cycling team win several Olympic golds, cycling has hit the mainstream. More than two million people cycle at least once a week in the UK.

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