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  • Can the Dave app help people keep track of their finances?
  • Can the Dave app help people keep track of their finances?
    Jakayla Toney (2020) ©
CASE STUDY

Dave: simplifying money management

To make managing their money easier for Americans, the Dave app links with existing bank accounts and aims to keep people in the black by notifying them when they’re about to go into overdraft. It also breaks down anticipated ingoings and outgoings, giving users an easy way to budget.

Location United States

Scope
Overdraft fees are a problem in America – in fact, in 2019, the major financial institutions in the US charged customers $11.68 billion in overdraft and non-sufficient fund fees. [1] But account stipulations and financial jargon can be confusing, which is why one company is aiming to change that. Referring to itself as the ‘finance version of David vs. Goliath’, Dave is a bank that offers 'banking for humans'.

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