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  • How are consumption habits changing in China?
  • How are consumption habits changing in China?
    Raychan (2018) ©
REPORT

Why are Chinese Gen Yers embracing minimalism?

Decades of domestic prosperity have seen Chinese citizens become coveted consumers the world over. But a new wind is blowing as young people move away from excessive materialism and towards a more conscious, minimalist approach. What’s driving this shift in shopping habits?

Location China

Scope 
Yang Zhihua set up a ‘training camp’ for minimalism in China in 2015, recruiting thousands of young people to practice living with fewer items. That same year, ‘uncluttering consultant’ Zhou Yiyan launched the public WeChat account No. 1 Organizing Platform, which has since gained in excess of 200,000 followers. [1] These minimalist influencers, many of whom are inspired by Marie Kondo, are proliferating in China’s urban centers. Beijing-based home organiser Bian Yuechun even created the concept of liucundao, which focuses on displaying possessions and evaluating them before any hasty disposal. [2] 

In a country known for its ...

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