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  • When is it okay for a brand to use emojis?
  • When is it okay for a brand to use emojis?
    Kevin Grieve (2018) ©
Science

🔬📱🤔? The science of emoji marketing

Emojis have become ubiquitous in digital communications, but their use in marketing campaigns hasn’t always been successful. Canvas8 spoke to Dr. Sara Kim, an associate professor at the University of Hong Kong, to learn how people interpret and react to brands that use these symbols.

Location Global

Scope
On World Emoji Day in July 2018, Apple unveiled 70 new emojis to join its collection of more than 2,666, with the latest additions including bald, ginger-haired, and curly-haired characters, as well as kangaroos and cupcakes. These symbols have changed the nature of online communications, and with research from 2016 finding that 92% of the online population uses them, it’s a language that’s been adopted in almost every context – from The White House’s economic reports to the Oxford Dictionary’s ‘Word of the Year’.

Their growing importance in digital conversations has ...

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