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  • Can vibrations in water really make it healthier?
  • Can vibrations in water really make it healthier?
    Jennifer Regnier (2018) ©
CASE STUDY

Frequency H2O: bottled water with good vibrations

Frequency H2O promises increased health benefits thanks to its innovative ‘vibration treatment’ – a clever marketing ploy that is helping it sell 30,000 litres a month in Oz. But as industry bodies say, the water tastes really good, so it begs to reason that this gimmick actually works – but how?

Location Australia

Scope
Sometimes a product that relies on a gimmick can go a long way. Not because the gimmick piqued interest enough for someone to put their hand in their pocket, but because it surprisingly backs up the promise of a superior product. Frequency H2O is a bottled water brand that uses subsonic technology to send vibrations through the water, which alters its pH balance and ultimately promotes health, balance and harmony. Sounds like a load of white noise? Well, the water tastes surprisingly good, so say the critics. [1]

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