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  • Biomimicry is design inspired by nature
  • Biomimicry is design inspired by nature
    FotoMediamatic (2018) ©
Thought leader

How can nature inspire sustainable design?

As eco-conscious shoppers put pressure on brands to be sustainable, what can they learn from nature? Canvas8 spoke to Michael Pawlyn, founding director of Exploration Architecture and Nudgestock speaker, to find out how biomimicry can solve some of the world’s material problems.

Location Global / North America / Northern Europe

Scope
In May 2018, architecture firm Humphreys & Partners unveiled blueprints for a multi-use beehive structure as a conceptual design for the UberAIR Skyports, the stations where the company’s flying taxis would stop to board, unload passengers and recharge. [1] With the capacity to support 150 landings and 600 passengers per hour, the structure was made from self-healing bio-concrete (a mixture of concrete and limestone), which would be capable of embedding bacteria and foliage that absorb greenhouse gases and noise. [2] The idea of employing natural processes, like those of bacteria and foliage, in design projects ...

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