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  • Providing a safe space for children to learn about LGBT issues
  • Providing a safe space for children to learn about LGBT issues
    Krists Luhaers, Creative Commons (2016) ©
CASE STUDY

Queer Kids Stuff: LGBTQ education for children

With LGBTQ kids experiencing more bullying, risky sexual behaviour and higher suicide rates than their non-LGBTQ counterparts, educating young people on LGBTQ issues is more important than ever. So, how is Queer Kids Stuff and other brands getting the message across?

Location North America

Scope
Gay marriage was legalised in 2015 and employment protection for LGBTQ people has been introduced across some states. But LGBTQ kids still experience more bullying, risky sexual behavior and higher suicide rates than their non-LGBTQ counterparts. Could this be improved by intervening early on and delivering positive education about these issues? Queer Kids Stuff is a web series that delivers bite-size educational videos covering topics from ‘What does gay mean?’ to ‘Let’s discuss homophobia’.

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“I definitely saw a niche that wasn’t being filled,” says creator and host, Lindsay Amer. “This was something that I wish I ...

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