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  • Who would want to squat rather than rent?
  • Who would want to squat rather than rent?
    Dot Dot Dot, 2017 ©
CASE STUDY

Dot Dot Dot: community spirit property guardians

One in four Britons will be renting by 2021 but with the average rental in London over £1,200, Londoners are having to get creative with housing. Dot Dot Dot is a property guardianship that encourages community spirit, but what are the motivations for becoming a property guardian?

Location United Kingdom

Scope
“In the last decade, London has become increasingly hard for young people from across the UK to pursue a career in which a move to the capital is necessary,” says Farrah Storr, Editor of Cosmopolitan magazine. And with the average rental in London costing £1,246 a month, while the average income for people aged 22 to 29 is between £1,829 and £1,924, an affordable roof over your head is increasingly a barrier to stepping foot onto the career ladder. [1][2] It’s why in early 2017 Cosmo collaborated with property guardian provider Dot Dot Dot on ...

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