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  • Everybody procrastinates, but not everyone is a procrastinator
  • Everybody procrastinates, but not everyone is a procrastinator
    Jo St. Pierre, Creative Commons (2016) ©
Science

Why wait? The science of procrastination

Gone to the gym? Replied to all your emails? You may make promises to be productive, but chances are you’ll procrastinate at least some of the time. Canvas8 sat down with Joseph Ferrari, associate professor at DePaul University, to understand why people put off tasks until the last minute.

Location Global

Scope
We all put things off, whether that’s by scrolling aimlessly through Instagram instead of going to a spin class, surfing the internet when there are emails to reply to, or re-writing to-do lists when there’s more than enough to do already. In fact, research published in Science has found we spend 47% of our time thinking about something other than what we’re actually doing. And with procrastination supposedly quadrupling over the past three decades, it’s no wonder it feels like there’s never enough time in the day.

But putting off tasks isn’t just a ...

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