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  • Buzzbike targets the 25% of London commuters who arrive by bike
  • Buzzbike targets the 25% of London commuters who arrive by bike
    Buzzbike (2017) ©
CASE STUDY

Buzzbike: A free ride for carrying ads

In London, cyclists have taken to the streets like never before, with a quarter of commuters now travelling by bike. Buzzbike offers free bicycles to cyclists, in exchange for pedalling ads, which give brands opportunity to tailor hyperlocal campaign. But do people really want to ride branded bikes?

Location United Kingdom

Scope
Over the last decade, cycling has broken out of the shadows and into the mainstream. Over two million people in the UK now cycle at least once a week, and London sees 25% of commuters arriving  by bike. [1][2] But the cost of a good frame, insurance, gear and the rest all adds up and is off-putting to some. What if you could ride a bike for free?

Buzzbike offers Londoners access to a stylish Cooper model worth £700 for a fraction of the RRP. Given that the average bike goes for over ...

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