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  • From the depths of the internet, a political movement emerges
  • From the depths of the internet, a political movement emerges
    Johnny Silvercloud, Creative Commons (2016) ©
Subculture

Who are the ‘alt-right’?

The period immediately after the 2016 presidential election has seen a flurry of reports and think pieces analysing what exactly led to Donald Trump’s triumph. At the heart of these discussions is the ‘alt-right’, but who are the people behind this group? What do they believe and why do they believe it?

Location United States

Scope
The months since the election of Donald Trump have seen a flurry of articles, op-eds and think-pieces analysing the political and cultural forces that turned the one-time reality TV star into the president of the US. Much chatter has filled the airwaves, and miles of column inches racked up, as the media has gotten to grips with ideas such as post-truth and fake news, and the burgeoning populist backlash against mainstream politics.

At the heart of these discussions is the 'alt-right' – a catch-all term for a loose network of online forums, outspoken political pundits, and alternative media outlets ...

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