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  • Will localised lingo last much longer?
  • Will localised lingo last much longer?
    Newthinking Communications, Creative Commons (2016) ©
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How is language evolving in the UK?

The English language is constantly shifting, with merging communities and tech making it evolve faster than ever; 86% of British parents think teens speak a different language on social media. So how can brands use words, emoticons and colloquialisms to better communicate with their audiences?

Location United Kingdom

Scope
The English language is constantly shifting, but research shows it’s now changing faster than ever before. With so many factors influencing the way we communicate – from the internet and technology to social mobility and immigration – how we talk can be just as important as what we say.

A study commissioned by Samsung found that 86% of British parents think teens speak a wholly different language on social media and mobile messaging. [1] And between May and August 2015, 1,000 new words were added to OxfordDictionaries.com in its latest attempt to compile all contemporary slang and ...

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