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  • Why do people make and break New Year’s resolutions?
  • Why do people make and break New Year’s resolutions?
    Hypnotica Studios Infinite, Creative Commons (2013) ©
Science

...3, 2, 1! The science of New Year’s resolutions

After the clock strikes midnight and the champagne bottle’s emptied, January 1st welcomes the most hopeful of traditions – New Year’s resolutions. But why do they rarely last beyond January? Lizzy Pope, who studies health behaviours, explains why people find it hard to stick to their goals.

Location United States

Scope
After the clock strikes midnight and the champagne has been downed, January 1st welcomes the most hopeful and optimistic of traditions – New Year’s resolutions. According to a YouGov poll, 63% of Brits intended to make a resolution for 2015, but around a third had probably broken them by the end of January.

It’s the same in the US; of the 40% to 50% of the population who made a resolution at the start of the previous year, it’s thought that a quarter didn’t last a week. And the majority of these resolutions unsurprisingly revolved ...

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