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  • Japan's ‘enlightened generation’ are set to head abroad
  • Japan's ‘enlightened generation’ are set to head abroad
    Garry Knight, Creative Commons (2012) ©
CASE STUDY

Tobitate! Young Ambassador Programme: mobilising Japan’s ambivalent youth

Japanese Gen Yers are often called the ‘enlightened generation’. Yet while they’re more self-aware and less materialistic than their parents, they’re also more risk-averse. Can the Tobitate! Young Ambassador Programme convince them to leave the comfort of home and study abroad?

Location Japan

Scope
In Japan, Gen Yers are often referred to as the ‘enlightened generation’ – a label almost as misunderstood as the new breed who wear it. [1] While young people are more self-aware and less materialistic than their parents, they’re also more risk-averse, leading deliberately cautious lives within the comfort of their own country. Enlightenment, for Japanese young adults, is a struggle to maintain the status quo while coping with economic uncertainty.

Hoping to address what’s seen as a ‘widespread indifference to the world’, PM Shinzō Abe’s administration is joining forces with the private sector to radically alter ...

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