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  • Will Unmade change how we buy fashion in the future?
  • Will Unmade change how we buy fashion in the future?
    Unmade (2015) ©
CASE STUDY

Unmade: a customised winter wardrobe

When buying clothes, people want choice – whether that’s their name embroidered on a bag, a unique colour combo, or a finer blend of wool. Customised knitting brand Unmade lets consumers choose colours and adapt patterns from a range of jumpers or scarves. Is this the future of fashion?

Location United Kingdom

Scope
When buying clothes, people want more choice – whether that’s their name embroidered on a bag, a unique colour combination or a finer blend of wool. Many people also want to be part of the design processes, adapting products to their exact requirements.

According to a 2015 Deloitte report, “consumers are increasingly dictating what they want, when and where they want it. They have become both critics and creators, demanding a more personalised service and expecting to be given the opportunity to shape the products and services they consume.” [1] And labels like customised knitting brand Unmade ...

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