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  • Sporting fantasies are set to become a virtual reality
  • Sporting fantasies are set to become a virtual reality
    TED Conference, Creative Commons (2015) ©
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How VR is changing sport

Rather than dramatically breaking into the mainstream, virtual reality has slowly acquiesced into the collective consciousness. The arena of sport, however, provides a unique opportunity for the tech, potentially transforming these perennial pastimes for fans, players and sponsors alike.

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Save for increased professionalism and bigger bucks, sport is timeless. The defining tenets of major sports rest as they did decades ago; players play under the same rules, occupy the same pitches, and wear the same basic equipment. But could virtual reality be about to change these perennial pastimes for fans, players and sponsors alike?

While VR’s entrance into people’s daily lives has been marked as imminent for a while – in 2014 sales of virtual reality headsets were predicted to grow 13,150% over three years, with the market estimated to be worth $4 billion by 2018 – in ...

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