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  • What German food looks like when you go beyond bratwurst
  • What German food looks like when you go beyond bratwurst
    Sascha Kohlmann, Creative Commons (2014) ©
REPORT

How German food goes beyond bratwurst

Did you know that the doner kebab was invented in Berlin? Or that Germans had cottoned on to kale way before it was cool? Canvas8 sat down with Ursula Heinzelmann – former chef and author of Beyond Bratwurstto get a flavour of what German foodies really serve up for dinner.

Location Germany

Scope
Did you know that in Germany beer sales are down? 2013 was the seventh consecutive year that sales declined, while one in every 20 beers drunk is now non-alcoholic. [1] Would you have thought that vegetarianism is on the up? Between 2011 and 2014, the number of vegetarians doubled to about 3.7% of the population. [2] Did you know that the doner kebab was invented in Berlin? Or that kale was big on the German food scene before the rest of the world adopted it at as the poster veg for hipster health food?

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