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  • Can driverless cars eliminate gridlock in cities?
  • Can driverless cars eliminate gridlock in cities?
    Matt Cornock, Creative Commons (2014) ©
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Is the future of driving driverless?

In 2015 the UK government announced a £20 million fund to develop driverless cars. The aim is simple – make driving easier, improve safety, cut congestion and reduce pollution. The automated car industry is set to be worth £900 billion by 2025, but are people ready to take their hands off the wheel?

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The driverless car – an idea that has the Top Gear generation rattled – will be on our roads sooner than we think. Earlier in 2015, the UK government announced a £20 million fund to develop autonomous vehicle technology, with an expectation that the industry will be worth £900 billion by 2025. [1]

The aim of the driverless car is simple – to make driving easier, improve safety, cut congestion and reduce pollution. But it brings with it a new way of travelling by car, enabling people to use the time to work, stream, read or simply ...

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