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  • You don't need a beach to have a surfer's soul
  • You don't need a beach to have a surfer's soul
    El Condor, Creative Commons (2011) ©
CASE STUDY

Teen America: the Coasties

From Fangirls to JK Poppers, the US is home to a range of teen subcultures. In the first of a series exploring American Gen Y and Z tribes, Andrea Graham – founder of Youth Tribes – delves into the sun-bleached world of Coasties. How is this group redefining the beach and action sports enthusiast?

Location United States

Scope
California dreaming has long held a powerful grasp over the psyche of American youth. From beach music and neon surfwear to sun-bleached hair and teeny bikinis, the surfer and skater lifestyle has been synonymous with endless summers and trendsetting cool. Surf culture alone is worth an estimated $6.3 billion in the US, and the global surf industry – including surfing gear and lifestyle clothing – could generate more than $13 billion by 2017. [1]

But today’s surfer girls and skater boys, or ‘Coasties’, are quite different from the archetypes developed by brands like Rip Curl ...

Canvas8

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