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  • Why are we all training our brains?
    Muse (2014) ©
REPORT

Is brain training a no-brainer?

Whether it's headbands that help you meditate or apps that claim to stretch the memory; we're increasingly looking to technology to train our brains. But what's the real science behind this growing industry? And why are so many people turning to technology to get their heads in the right space?

Location North America / Northern Europe

Scope
Brain-enhancing hardware and software has entered the consumer space. Whether we want to be calmer or cleverer, the technology industry has rushed to fill the demand. From headbands that help you meditate to mobile apps that flex the memory; we’re increasingly looking to technology to enhance what we’ve got.

And it’s an industry that’s worth big bucks. Lumosity, a popular maker of brain training mobile games, has raised $31.5 million in funding, while InteraXon – a design firm responsible for a brainwave-reading headband – has raised $7.2 million. [1][2]

Canvas8

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