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  • Gen Z are collaborative in media, valuing creation as much as consumption
  • Gen Z are collaborative in media, valuing creation as much as consumption
    Matthew Kenwrick, Creative Commons (2012) ©
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Why Gen Z prefer peer-produced content

Did YouTube kill the Hollywood star? In the second installment of this two-parter, we look at why Gen Z value the talents and opinions of their digital peers, what services they are flocking to and how a shift towards user generated content will affect the future of media production and distribution.

Location United States

Scope
Did YouTube kill the Hollywood star? According to a recent study by Variety, the five most influential figures among Americans aged 13-18 are all YouTube vloggers. [1] Drawn to the friendly and relatable nature of vloggers and internet stars, Gen Z has displayed an overwhelming preference for authentic, peer-produced content over traditional media.  That is not to say that the days of the mega Hollywood blockbuster, or video game franchise is over, far from it. Gen Z still love consuming high quality entertainment, but they are increasingly intrigued by how their favourite interests, hobbies and fictional works ...

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