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  • China’s Gen Y are taking shopping mobile
  • China’s Gen Y are taking shopping mobile
    Yu-Jen Shih, Creative Commons (2014) ©
CASE STUDY

Topshop & ShangPin: fuelling China's mobile shopping habit

Do physical stores matter any more in China? When Topshop launched in China in 2014 it didn’t bother with bricks and mortar. Instead, taking cues from its Gen Y customers (who spend up to 30% of their day online), it partnered with an established fashion website. Is this non-traditional route proving a hit?

Location China

Scope
Do physical stores matter anymore in China? When Topshop launched in China last year it didn’t bother with bricks and mortar. Instead, it took cues from its target consumers, young Chinese born in the ’80s and ’90s who spend up to 30% of their day online. [1]

When Zara, Uniqlo and H&M launched in China they set-up flagship stores in high footfall locations. [2] But when Topshop launched in November 2014, the brand didn’t have a single mainland store. It took an online-first strategy instead partnering with high-end Chinese e-tailer ShangPin. Is this ...

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