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  • In-game and in-app advertisers capitalise on the already-rapt attention of users
  • In-game and in-app advertisers capitalise on the already-rapt attention of users
    Frank Koehntopp, Creative Commons (2014) ©
CASE STUDY

Vungle: opt-in advertising for mobile gamers

Americans consume more than half of all digital media through mobile apps, and Vungle hopes to become the 'Google of mobile ads'. But can an ad network based on hints and rewards for gamers dominate the in-app advertising market? And do players really want ads while they game?

Location Global

Scope
Americans consume more than half of all digital media through mobile apps. This represents a big change from just a few years ago, when nearly all internet content was downloaded through browsers like Mozilla’s Firefox. [1]

This shift in internet consumption hasn’t been lost on Google, which dominates browser-based advertising on the internet with its Ad Sense product. The internet giant is backing a Silicon Valley start-up called Vungle which aims to become for mobile advertisements what Google is for text-based ads.

But does an ad network based on hints and rewards for gamers ...

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