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  • London: too expensive for Gen rent to stick around long term?
  • London: too expensive for Gen rent to stick around long term?
    liborious, Creative Commons (2013) ©
REPORT

Why are 30-somethings leaving London?

“When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life,” so the saying goes. But men and women between the ages of 30 and 39 are fleeing the capital. Are property prices just driving them out, or is London really cooling? Will the supposed mass migration prompt a rebalancing of pricing and opportunities?

Location United Kingdom--London

Scope
“When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life,” so the saying goes. But it seems that men and women between the ages of 30 and 39 are tiring of London house prices, as record numbers flee the capital.

But is London really cooling? Will it soon be nothing more than a playground for bankers, tourists and foreign investors? Or will this supposed mass migration prompt a rebalancing of pricing and opportunities?

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