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  • 'Bro' culture has a soft spot for short shorts
  • 'Bro' culture has a soft spot for short shorts
    Chubbies (2015) ©
CASE STUDY

Chubbies: a start-up brand for the neo frat boy

Anyone who’s seen an American college movie is familiar with the stereotypical frat boy; excessive boozing, scantily clad sorority girls and fierce camaraderie define him. It’s nostalgia for such ‘bromance’ culture which is the driving force behind San Francisco-based shorts brand Chubbies. But how did these tiny shorts manage to unite a ‘bro’-based style cult?


Location United States

Anyone who’s ever seen an American high school or college movie is familiar with the stereotypical frat boy. From excessive boozing to scantily clad sorority girls to the fearsome camaraderie shared between bros, many look back on their college years through the rosiest of rose-tinted lenses.

That wistful nostalgia formed the driving force behind San Francisco-based shorts brand Chubbies. Founded in 2011 by former Stanford bros Rainer Castillo, Kyle Hency, Tom Montgomery and Preston Rutherford, in what they’ve dubbed a “quadfecta of management excellence”, the brand embodies everything there is to love about bro culture. [

Canvas8

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