Hold On!

Hold Up

Please select a minimum of three sectors in the menu above.

Got It
  • Can newspapers survive the growing shift to digital?
  • Can newspapers survive the growing shift to digital?
    Newspaper Club, Creative Commons (2013) ©
CASE STUDY

Guardian Midland Goods Shed: experience a newspaper in 3D

With newspaper sales continuing to fall, the news industry is facing a crisis. How do you sell the news if everyone expects it for free? Can The Guardian sell the ‘world’s leading liberal voice’ through workshops, lectures and coffee? And where is its place in the digital revolution?

Location United Kingdom

Scope
With newspaper sales continuing their decade-long decline, the news industry is facing a crisis of both identity and profit. How do you sell the news if everyone expects it for free? For a growing number of media companies, the answer lies in diversification – and for British newspaper The Guardian, that means embarking on one of the most ambitious diversifications of all.

It’s turning an old railway shed into a multipurpose cultural and events space to sell the ‘world’s leading liberal voice’ through workshops, lectures and coffee. But will The Guardian in 3D resonate with its readers as ...

Canvas8

Related

  • Start-up offers writers $100,000 per article Start-up offers writers $100,000 per article

    Former New York Times editor Jill Abramson has announced some headline-grabbing start-up plans. Her new media venture will be offering writers $100,000 advances, in return for the most explosive and engrossing long-form investigative journalism.

  • CNET expands into print publishing CNET expands into print publishing

    A grinning LL Cool J stands in front of a red backdrop, with headlines like ‘Confessions of a smartphone thief’ and ‘Big or bigger? Which iPhone 6 is the right fit?’ drifting in the foreground. This is the face of online tech outlet CNET’s first foray into print publishing. 

  • Media outlets are gamifying the news Media outlets are gamifying the news

    In an attempt to get people engaged with the news, some publishers are taking cues from video games and gamifying the news. Just as news transcended the medium of text and became more visual with video, a new generation of news is becoming increasingly interactive.

  • New York Times embraces streaming New York Times embraces streaming

    These days, any event, be it significant or minor, is available to 'stream' through social media. From wars to traffic jams, it's almost guaranteed that someone, somewhere will be live tweeting or Vine-ing it. The New York Times has announced 'Watching'  a new stream format addition to its homepage.

  • Article image PaperLater: a personalised paper to read at your leisure

    In an average day over 92,000 articles are posted online - the sheer volume of content is just unmanageable and impossible to consume. Combating this, UK-based PaperLater lets you save articles from the web, and in three days a customised printed paper is delivered to your door.

  • Article image Borough deep: BKLYNR's slow news movement

    Returning to longform journalism, subscription-based web magazine BKLYNR is at the head of the subcompact publishing movement. Is the web's own 'slow news' revolution starting to gather pace?

  • Article image Bite-sized stories: why Circa gets mobile

    Following the transformation from print to online news, which saw many newspapers adopt paywalls, the news industry is adapting again – this time for mobile devices.

  • Article image Evolving the magazine: how publishers are diversifying

    'Print is dead' – or is it? Adapting to a complex digital landscape, publishers are finding new ways to extend the brand.