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  • Australia’s home-grown fashion brands are big business
  • Australia’s home-grown fashion brands are big business
    Black Milk (2014) ©
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How can a local cult outsmart global fashion?

With international fashion brands making competition on the Australian high street even more intense, a new generation of home-grown brands are building fiercely loyal style tribes both online and off. But can these emerging fashion cults fend off global competition?

Location Australia

Scope
As global brands like Zara, Topshop and Uniqlo enter what’s typically been an underserved fashion market, style-conscious Australians are looking at an expanding array of choice. The race is on to become the Australia’s next big fashion brand.

Local brands are protecting their share by tapping into the nation’s deeply ingrained social habits, turning brands into lifestyle communities – whether it’s cult retailer Black Milk’s fan-driven conventions, where shoppers come together and gush over their new blood-spattered zombie leggings, or e-commerce Showpo’s intimate insider philosophy, where staff regularly post ‘behind the scene’ selfies to nearly half a million ...

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